• NDP leader Cam Broten greets supporters before the leaders' debate on March 23.
    NDP leader Cam Broten greets supporters before the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Brandon Harder

  • NDP supporters rally outside before the leaders' debate on March 23.
    NDP supporters rally outside before the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Emily Pasuik

  • NDP leader Cam Broten poses with supporters before the leaders' debate on March 23.
    NDP leader Cam Broten poses with supporters before the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Joelle Seal

  • NDP supporters cheer as Cam Broten arrives to the leaders' debate on March 23.
    NDP supporters cheer as Cam Broten arrives to the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Brandon Harder

  • NDP and Sask Party supporters rally outside before the leaders' debate on March 23.
    NDP and Sask Party supporters rally outside before the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Laura Beamish

  • Sask Party leader Brad Wall arrives before the leaders' debate on March 23.
    Sask Party leader Brad Wall arrives before the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Brandon Harder

  • Sask Party leader Brad Wall speaks to journalists at the leaders' debate on March 23.
    Sask Party leader Brad Wall speaks to journalists at the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Emily Pasiuk

  • Sask Party leader Brad Wall before the leaders' debate began on March 23.
    Sask Party leader Brad Wall before the leaders' debate began on March 23.

    By Emily Pasiuk

  • NDP leader Cam Broten before the leaders' debate began on March 23.
    NDP leader Cam Broten before the leaders' debate began on March 23.

    Photo by Jessie Anton

  • NDP leader Cam Broten before the leaders' debate began on March 23.
    NDP leader Cam Broten before the leaders' debate began on March 23.

    By Laura Beamish

  • NDP leader Cam Broten and Sask Party leader Brad Wall pose for photos before the leaders' debate on March 23.
    NDP leader Cam Broten and Sask Party leader Brad Wall pose for photos before the leaders' debate on March 23.

    By Jessie Anton

Sask Party leader Brad Wall addresses reporters following a heated March 23rd leaders' debate. Photo by Brandon Harder.

Analysis by Brandon Harder

Barring catastrophe, the Saskatchewan Party look to be a shoo-in to form another majority government following the April 4 election. A struggling economy, a mounting deficit, sins of past conservatives and a strong NDP legacy should all be dogging the incumbents in the run-up to the election. But they’re not.

Voters ensure that their voices are heard at the CBC Leadership Debate on March 23. A civic engagement application called Vote Compass has been utilized by CBC during this provincial election, which revealed that both economic and environmental issues are important to Saskatchewan voters this election. Photo by Brandon Harder.

Backgrounder by Joelle Seal

As voters head to the polls, economy and environment are often posed as conflicting priorities for Saskatchewan. With an economy that relies heavily on natural resource development, policies that may mitigate climate change, such as a carbon tax, can be seen as detrimental to our economy. The current economic downturn makes the possibility of more economic hardship a frightening prospect for many Saskatchewan voters.

Saskatchewan Party leader Brad Wall (left) and New Democratic Party leader Cam Broten (right) make small-talk before kicking off the 2016 Leaders’ Debate with the film tax credit on March 23, 2016. Photo by Jessie Anton.

Backgrounder by Jessie Anton

On March 21, 2012, the Saskatchewan Party government discontinued the Saskatchewan Film Employment Tax Credit, shocking the local film industry and the province’s Chamber of Commerce alike. Although there was no talk of the film tax credit during the 2011 provincial election, the subsidy has resurfaced in 2016 party platforms, being the first topic of discussion at the provincial leaders’ debate on March 23, 2016.

Analysis by Alex Johnson

The Saskatchewan Party may have missed the mark with their proposed Graduation Retention Program, aimed to keep post-secondary students living and working in the province. At first glance it looks like graduates will benefit from the incentive, but the real winners are existing homeowners, realtors, and lawyers.

Political candidates meet for the Agdebate at the Persephone Theatre in Saskatoon on March 22. Photo by Tennessa Wild.

Backgrounder by Tennessa Wild

Agriculture employs over 50,000 people in Saskathewan and is a major driver of provincial exports. Come election time, it matters. As a cornerstone of Saskatchewan heritage, it is the government’s responsibility to ensure the industry stays strong and viable for future generations.

Ese Idu, an international student from Nigeria who attends the University of Regina, is struggling to find work in Saskatchewan. Photo by Richelle Peace.

Analysis by Richelle Peace

Saskatchewan’s economy has been booming since the late 90s and now it is steadily falling because of a number of reasons that Cam Broten, New Democrat Party leader is promising to change.

The Active Families Benefit only provides compensation for registration and membership fees. Extra costs for sports equipment and transportation are not compensated for under the AFB. Photo by Allison Bamford.

Analysis by Allison Bamford

In the days leading up to an election, Saskatchewan voters can expect to see a vast array of proposed policies around healthcare, education, the environment and, of course, the economy. However, one item not being discussed in this year’s election platforms is the Active Families Benefit.

Jim Farney, political science professor at University of Regina says the problem is not the barrier thing as much as the 'do I care' thing. Photo by Busayo Osobade.

Backgrounder by Busayo Osobade

Saskatchewan residents who are out of the province on election day are encouraged to use the various options available to cast their vote and make their voice heard. If you are a student, studying outside the province or a traveler enjoying a holiday abroad, you can and should exercise your right to vote.

Brad Wall is not afraid to speak against Ottawa for Saskatchewan. Photo by Laura Beamish

Backgrounder by Laura Beamish

In Canada, the federal and provincial governments must work together to function at full capacity and allow citizens to enjoy life, liberty, and security of the person. But these days, Saskatchewan and Ottawa rarely see eye to eye, making it difficult to achieve anything positive.

Lynn Barber vice president of URSU, talks about the election's financial impact to university students. Photo by Cheryl Lu.

Analysis by Cheryl Lu

The result of the provincial election might impact the University of Regina’s students financially - or not.

NDP and Sask Party supporters await the arrival of their party leaders before the debate. Photo by Emily Pasiuk.

Backgrounder by Emily Pasiuk

If you’re new to the province and you bring up the Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan you might get either a scoff or an understanding smile that seems to say, "You don’t know the half of it." Most people just seem to know the discourse surrounding the PCs is tense and coloured with scandal; it’s as though it were an integral part of being Saskatchewanian.

If the Sask Party is re-elected they've pledged to privatize 40 public liquor stores. Photo by Michael Joel-Hansen.

Analysis by Michael Joel-Hansen

When the Saskatchewan Party government announced that it planned to partially privatize Saskatchewan’s public liquor retail system there should have been very little surprise from a political perspective. The fact that a center-right government would make such a move makes a great deal of sense, in that many of those who support the party view liquor retail as a business that should be left to the private sector.

Some believe that voter participation amongst young adults may increase as the popularity of mobile media grows. Photo by Alex Antoneshyn.

Backgrounder by Alex Antoneshyn

If you’re between the ages of 18 and 34, there’s a 57 per cent chance you’re reading this on your mobile phone. The older you are, the same likelihood decreases, but one fact remains: a growing number of Canadians are reaching to their phones for news.